6.22.2015

Leaked! SDCC 2015 Ultimate Spider-Man 'Shanzhai' Teaser Poster & EW Magazine Cover!

[Click to enlarge] 


Are these leaked images of SDCC Ultimate Spider-Man teasers the reason that Marvel Studios and Sony Pictures have so abruptly and mysteriously pulled out of pitching their tents at San Diego Comic-Con next month? St. Paco (aka Professor XXL) ain't really one to spread rumors, boys and girls, but...he's gonna offer a co-sign by spreadin' this one. [Innocent smile]

6.21.2015

[Press-N-Play®] Dezine – My Lover



All songs posted to the Your Kung Fu Sucks! blog are the property of their respective copyright holders.Their use here is strictly intended for promotional and informational purposes only. NOT FOR SALE. Please support the artists featured on the YKFS blog by buying their original CDs and mp3s where and whenever applicable. Any artist who would like to have their music removed from this promotional project may do so by contacting the administrator at stpaco@gmail.com.

6.20.2015

Making the "Leaked" SDCC Ultimate Spider-Man 'Shanzhai' Teaser Poster & EW Magazine Cover


Between you and me...and a bunch of other people who'll read this, I'd also planned to do a Spider-Man-related mini movie poster back at the time that the Marvel Blaxploitation mini movie poster series was produced (blogged about here). I toyed around with a few difference designs, but I just couldn't make it happen. Maybe I had completely run out of creative juice after making the other four pieces in the series. 

Actor/rapper Donald Glover (aka Childish Gambino) has been thought by many to be a promising prospect for the Spider-Man role in film ever since he sprang out of bed rocking Spidey costume pajamas in the opening credits of the Community TV show. The audacious notion of a black Spider-Man even prompted Marvel writer Brian Bendis to actually create "Miles Morales", an all-new web-slinging hero for the 21st century inspired by Glover. 

Despite a few years of DG buzz, Marvel Studios recently made known the plans that are being hatched to do another Spider-Man movie relaunch, including the character's introduction into the Avengers movie universe. But right off the bat they made it clear that they intend to use some other as yet unnamed actor, instead of Mr. Glover as Spider-Man. I'd bet my comic book money that I was far from alone in feeling annoyed with that news. 

Fortunately for me, though, thanks to the Photoshop™ gods and perseverance on my part, I've had an opportunity to visualize a tiny bit of what has been pinging around inside my brain ever since the idea of Glover playing Spider-Man on screen began to waft through the ether. But first, how about a little bit more backstory.

A week ago, during the early part of a phone chat with my friend Gigi, I was gently scolded for my not yet having put together a zine & art show that I had talked about doing; a ten year retrospective on my underground publications and art. She finally cut me some slack, though, since I am still working on essays for the book that I'm writing and designing.

After that call ended,  I felt inspired to go through old folders on the Mac, and to look over the pieces that I'd planned to showcase in the exhibit. In one of the folders were the previously failed attempts at a Spider-Man mini movie poster. The creative juices promptly began flowin', and somewhere around 2 hours later, it all came together. But I continued to tweek and twerk (no, I didn't really twerk) the design for several more hours.

It's funny how that works, kiddies. Something that didn't at all gel creatively before––no matter how hard you tried to make it happen––finally comes together. Admittedly, though, part of the problem is that you kept (or keep) approaching the subject from the same direction. Yet, by taking the idea back to the proverbial drawing board, and starting from scratch, you achieve the creative breakthrough that you'd hoped for when your project was started.  

Beginning this blog entry, I had planned to share some of the disparate visual elements that went into to making the full mini poster image (there's 30 layers to this thing). But now I don't wanna ruin the illusion. I also thought that I'd detail the story ideas that I have for my "Ultimate Spider-Man" movie, which I've set in Chicago, Tokyo and Hong Kong (NYC settings have become a bit cliché in movies today), but I think that I'll hold onto 'em.

If you liked last year's Marvel Blaxploitation mini movie poster series, then I hope that you'll dig this new addition––and bonus. It was a lot of fun bringing these new pieces to life. Especially when considering the major difficulty that I'd had with making a Spidey piece the first time around. As they say: perseverance pays off. Or is it persistence? [Shrug] Meh. Same thing.  

Shout outs to Donald Glover, Jamie Chung, Jamie Foxx, Brian Bendis, Marvel Comics, Columbia Pictures, Sony Pictures, Entertainment Weekly, Complex, San Diego Comic-Con––and anyone who temporarily fell for the illusion in this digital hatchet job and believed for a moment that an Ultimate Spider-Man movie was on the horizon. Uh, and shout out to Samuel L. Jackson, well...just because. 

6.19.2015

[Archives] Vapors All-City Magazine – Tokyo Issue, Dec-Jan 2003


Features: Ipath Japan//DGK SF-Tokyo//Lui Araraki//Street artist Naomi//Def Jam Japan//Large Professor

6.17.2015

[Bookshelf] The Collected Works of Vaughn Bode

In the early days of Ebay, I flipped this super vintage poster of a sexy centaur woman by the late comic book artist Vaughn Bode (1940-1975) that I'd found in a local bookstore. But I'll probably never part with the five trade paperbacks in my collection that feature Bode's collected comic book works. Published by Fantagraphics Books, these stellar trades contain classic strips by Bode culled from various self-published underground comix as well as comic strips that the cartoonist produced for several magazines, including National Lampoon's, Heavy Metal, and Witzend. Some of the trades from Fantagraphics' Bode Erotica series (4 volumes) are a little harder to find now for a reasonable price, but the Cheech Wizard, Deadbone and Junkwaffel trades can usually be found for around retail price. A must have for underground comix historians and students of old school graffiti art. Collect 'em all if you're cool like that, or just stick with the two Cheech Wizard volumes to get a sample of Bode's genius.  






6.16.2015

Work in Progress – Chico Roland Filmography


I'm not sure if I'm gonna use this in the essay collection that I'm working on, but I've been putting together a filmography on the prolofic African-American presence in old Japanese films and TV shows of the 60s, 70s and 80s known as Chico Roland. If you've seen Gamera vs. Monser X (1970), or Sonny Chiba's The Streetfighter (1974), then you've seen Roland in what are certain to have been his most widely viewed bit parts in the English speaking world. 

With regard to his filmography, it may actually end up being posted on YKFS when it's done, and I may run with something else on him for the book. In the meantime, shared above is the promo poster for the 1968 film, Great Insect War (aka Genocide), one of the thirty-something flicks in which Roland made appearances––but his face is also on the poster. If you're a fan of what is affectionately known in the states as 'Asian trash cinema', then Great Insect War is a must. Roland's amateurish but heartfelt brand of acting is over the top, but convincing.

There's even an action figure of Roland's character Charlie that was included with Shochiku Studios' DVD release of the film in Japan. You're really too cool for school when you can say that you have a toy in your image––in addition to having also filled out a wide variety of large and small roles in Japanese TV shows and films. 

Oh, and if you're indeed game to checking out Great Insect War (aka Genocide), I recommend that you juxtapose that watch against Seijun Suzuki’s Gate of Flesh (1964). Roland had a small part in the latter, but the film overall is a fairly stunning production.


Shochiku Science Fiction DVD – Great Insect War (1968)